Front Garden in Rim

After my drive-by hospital visit, I made another drive-by visit through the attractive Rim Area neighborhood near the University of Texas at El Paso (which I didn’t visit). It’s great to return to warmer times.

Photos are from 9/20/2020.

Of the several plant forms that make up well-designed gardens or natural areas of the desert, this front yard uses at least three.

Seasonally-deciduous plants (Prosopis glandulosa, Artemisia x ‘Powis Castle’), CAM plants (bluish Yucca rigida, green Yucca aloifolia), and groundcover that’s also a CAM plant (Maleophora lutea).

The Powis Castle Sage smells minty, from the oils on the feathery foliage. Though in dry weather one must rub the leaves, as the scent just doesn’t carry in the air. The other plants provide short flowering for moths and butterflies with their ever-present, bold forms.

The hummingbird magnet Hesperaloe parviflora grows in the distance by the lawn, which is secondary to the other plants as it should be.

The repeated clumps and groupings of Nasella tenuissima / Mexican Feathergrass unify that entire front area. That single Prosopis glandulosa / Texas Honey Mesquite with other groupings of yuccas, shrubs, and groundcovers add punctuation.

Somehow, in all my years visiting and even living nearby, I’ve never been down this street. Perhaps it was planted after I moved away in 2016?

Zooming in, Maleophora lutea / Rocky Point Iceplant (or Pink Iceplant) softens the spiky form of tough Yucca rigida / Sonoran Blue Yucca.

Yet another win for good design of an appealing place!

It’s also a win for gentle maintenance to retain and remove some of those Nasella clumps, which usually get out of hand.