After the Love is Gone: A Decade After Installation (part 2)

…Continued from the previous post, photos from 11/2/2019

Medical Office Building (by QUERCUS)

This office building and landscape were completed in 2009.

I remember the August day the design team completed our final inspection / punch list, as we stood under the portico. It had rained the day before, and the other team members (from San Antonio) remarked at how pleasant El Paso’s weather was in August compared to there.

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A lone Salvia greggii remains, in once-thriving groupings of that same plant among the boulders and other flowering plants.

Thank goodness for ProsopisHesperaloe, and Muhlenbergia!

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Spread out, Texas Honey Mesquite / Prosopis glandulosa! Too bad the small grass clumps were more in quantity and should be matured at 6 feet tall and wide by now…arroyo native, Sporobulus wrightii.

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The flow of Deergrass is something I was inspired by, seeing it done with another plant (Red Hesperaloe), in another climate (sub-humid prairie at Dallas Love Field), and on a business / design trip for the first phase of the main hospital.

It’s a disservice to use grasses or accent plants as a mere clump of 3 around a boulder! They need massing, with only a few plant or tree accents in small clumps.

This works for parking lot speeds and even walking to the front door.

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In back of the MOB, things fell apart more than in front.

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Unequal plant substitutions, new sidewalks, or just blight

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Poor Manfreda spp.: first rabbits, later no care and few remain

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The modest income from design fees is long gone after a shorter period on life’s necessities.

Yet, the care for my work, the long nights, or the appreciative client, colleague, or project user continue to pay off. In spite of the others who don’t involve me, let alone compensate me for that time.

I return to visit old designs when I can, to document. Even others’ work…

.

UTEP Centennial Plaza (by the office of Ten Eyck Landscape Architects)

I watched this project get built when I moved to El Paso in 2013, living a 10 minute walk away, and it was completed shortly after I moved to Las Cruces in 2016.

First, parking by this old and rugged native, Desert Willow / Chilopsis linearis.

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This holds together thanks to the generous use of mostly Chihuahuan Desert-region / environs plant species, with some adaptive mesic species. Not to mention, a strong maintenance commitment from the designer and owner. As part of their contracted services, the landscape architect’s office provided the owner’s crew hands-on maintenance instruction.

I.E. demonstrated how to do various tasks for various plant types, and not just once.

From what I see, this has worked and will continue to work, benefiting the owner and the array of those who enjoy the garden spaces at UTEP.

Never has there been the budget in my scope of work or support of the prime consultant to do that. Except out of the kindness of my heart or at most, I’m paid to add a maintenance sheet on the plan set for a few projects.

I can count my times when a wedding or quinceañera shoot isn’t happening at UTEP.

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Just seek out the good, and enjoy it like this guy!

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I can’t wait to ride one of these scooters or rent a bike, on some future trip to the “big city” of El Chuco!

3 Replies to “After the Love is Gone: A Decade After Installation (part 2)”

  1. David, David, David.

    Seriously?

    I know.

    We never lose hope.

    Instead, it’s, be-glad-they-hired-professional mentality.

    Human nature.

    We know what things could be. So easily, be. Worse, they don’t know/factor in the increased property value of our work, greater pollinator habitat, mental health.

    BTW, it’s Cary Grant saying your name 3x !

    Garden & Be Well, XOT

    Tara, Tara, Tara! Yes, never lose hope. An LA in Austin told me last year how it’s never too late to change one’s business model to have more control over projects, and be more involved. That’s one of my ideas or plans. And so glad to be free of the last place, regardless of other issues now!

    Liked by 1 person

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